NCSS Position Paper on Media Literacy Approved

ITHACA, NY- Dec. 1, 2016- The National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) approved an official Position Paper on Media Literacy in June of 2016. The paper was written by Chris Sperry, Project Look Sharp’s Director of Curriculum and Staff Development along with Frank Baker of the Media Literacy Clearinghouse. The position paper discusses how social studies educators can use images and videos to teach media literacy analysis to students.

The NCSS is an organization that is devoted solely to social studies education through engaging and supporting educators throughout all 50 states, the District of Columbia and 69 foreign countries. Its mission is: “to provide leadership, service, and support for all social studies educators.” With over 110 affiliated state, local and regional councils and associated groups, the NCSS membership extends to K-12 classroom teachers, college and university faculty members, curriculum designers and specialists and leaders in education.

Media literacy has become a hot-button issue for policy makers around the country today. According to Media Literacy Now, 15 states have acquired Media Literacy Now partners to work toward legislation to build awareness of the urgent need for media literacy education. New York is currently considering comprehensive media literacy education bills through Media Literacy Now advocates.

“At the core of learning is Literacy—the ability to access, analyze, evaluate and produce communication. Media literacy expands the traditional concept of literacy to include the forms of communication that dominate the lives of our students,” wrote Sperry and Baker, “If our students are to be literate, we must teach them the skills and habits of literacy for print and non-print mediated messages.”

Sperry and Baker further discussed how educators can teach media analysis to their students through critical inquiry, which involves the asking of key questions by both teachers and students. The key questions included within the paper focus on: audience and authorship, messages and meanings, and representations and reality.

The paper also provides examples of curriculum resources for social studies teachers at different grade levels focusing on media literacy integration.

The official Position Paper on Media Literacy is available on the NCSS website: http://www.socialstudies.org/publications/socialeducation/may-june2016/media-literacy.

And on the Project Look Sharp website at http://www.projectlooksharp.org/Articles/ncsspositionstatement.pdf

For more information, you can email us at looksharp@ithaca.edu or contact us by phone at 607-274-3471. To contact the authors, email Chris Sperry at csperry@ithaca.edu or contact Frank Baker through his website, http://frankwbaker.com/.

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Greening the Curriculum through Media Literacy Approaches to Sustainability Education.

Cyndy Scheibe and Chris Sperry presented at the 45th Annual Conference of the North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE) in Madison, Wisconsin. The conference was held to discuss how K-12 teachers could engage students in critical thinking about the environment and sustainability.

NAAEE is an organization that promotes environmental education primarily throughout North America but also extends borders to the rest of the world. Their mission is to accelerate environmental literacy and civic engagement through the power of environmental education.

The theme of the conference was: “From Inspiration to Impact: Inspiring stories. Compelling Evidence. Meaningful Impact.” It focused on powerful stories of innovation and success in environmental education from all over the world. The theme celebrated ways in which the NAAEE has inspired individuals to connect with nature and shape a sustainable future.

Project Look Sharp has showcased their nine environmental curriculum kits for the past three years at the NAAEE annual conference, and had an exhibitor booth again this year. The booth showcased Project Look Sharp’s “Process of Media Literacy” banner, curriculum kits, website and other resources to connect educators with PLS.

Chris and Cyndy’s presentation: Greening the Curriculum through Media Literacy Approaches to Sustainability Education, was held from 2:15-3:45 p.m Thursday afternoon. They gave an interactive 90-minute hands-on workshop on how to integrate media literacy and environmental education in K-12 classrooms.

This lively session posed the question of: “How can today’s K-12 teachers engage all students in critical thinking about environmental and sustainability issues while

still meeting standards-based curriculum requirements?”

The session showcased media literacy approaches to Environmental Education and E-STEM education (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). The workshop related media decodings to sustainability and environmental issues. It also evaluated internet searches and media literacy pedagogies, allowing the audience to explore PLS curriculum materials.

Project Look Sharp also showcased a documentary created by second graders at Caroline Elementary School in Tompkins County, New York last year as a part of the lesson plans created for lower elementary grades.

For more information about the event or curriculum, email

looksharp@ithaca.edu or call 607-274-3471.

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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WEBINAR: Media Constructions of Presidential Campaigns 2016

The 2nd Annual U.S. Media Literacy Week will be held from October 31-November 4, 2016. This week is designed to bring attention and visibility to media literacy education in the United States. The National Association for Media Literacy Education is working to create a media literacy week to showcase the amazing work done by media literacy educators and organizations across the country. The overall mission of Media Literacy Week is to highlight the power of media literacy education and its role in education today.

The events of Media Literacy Week begin with the Digital Citizenship Summit Kick Off Event and dive into several events spanning across the country. For more information on the event calendar visit: https://medialiteracyweek.us/home/calendar-of-events/.

Project Look Sharp celebrates the 2nd Annual Media Literacy Week with a webinar on the “Media Constructions of Presidential Campaigns”—a timely topic that you can apply immediately in your high school and college classrooms.  Join us on Tuesday, November 1 at 7PM EDT. Visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/media-constructions-of-presidential-campaigns-tickets-28556339781 to register.

In this highly interactive webinar, Sox Sperry, Project Look Sharp’s primary curriculum writer,  will demonstrate our unique and proven approach to constructivist media decoding. New and veteran educators will learn to:

  •     Embed the six key concepts of media literacy into your curriculum and tie them to educational standards;
  •     Engage students through their daily media landscape, then expand to study the historical context and to critically analyze the credibility of candidates & media representations;
  •     Teach in a way that models democracy—asking questions that unpack students’ different interpretations, while fostering productive dialog and critical thinking around “hot button” topics;
  •     Use Project Look Sharp’s large library of resources to create your own lessons that further your educational goals.

The media and lessons used are drawn from the popular Presidential Campaigns  (http://www.projectlooksharp.org/?action=presidential) curriculum collection, which is available free from our website and has just been updated for the 2016 campaign.

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Online resources for Project Look Sharp’s “Media Constructions of Presidential Campaigns” curriculum updated – just in time for election season

ITHACA, NY- October 3, 2016- Online resources for Project Look Sharp’s “Media Constructions of Presidential Campaigns” curriculum updated – just in time for election season

In anticipation of the upcoming 2016 presidential election, Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative “Project Look Sharp” has updated their popular high school through college curriculum to include media resources comparing past presidential campaigns with the current election.

Sox Sperry describes the new materials via an article published in “Social Education,” the National Council for the Social Studies journal, “Social Education and is entitled “(Not so) Unprecedented: Media analysis of the 2016 Presidential Race and Its Historical Precedents.””. The article outlines newly created resources, and how teachers can find and use them in the classroom, as well as the original curriculum materials – which have been downloaded by thousands of educators.

The article poses the question: “How can we bring these issues into the classroom in a way that engages students, and that teaches core content and develops the skills needed to strengthen critical thinking?” To answer this question, Sperry’s article includes resources such as historic and contemporary media documents for student analysis, media literacy questions, contrasting images and sample conversations between teachers and students to help guide the conversations.

“Helping students to develop media literacy skills––the abilities to access, analyze, evaluate and produce media messages––is one way to support habits of inquiry consistent with social studies learning,” wrote Sperry, “This article highlights the analysis of media messages from past elections and compares them with current media messages, as a way to invite students to reflect on key questions related to media literate citizenship.

The original lessons, “Media Constructions of Presidential Campaigns” by Chris Sperry and Sox Sperry, contain over 200 curriculum activities that use media messages from electoral campaigns beginning in 1800 and continuing to present day to help students critically analyze presidential campaigns.

Documents, curriculum materials and lesson plans within “Media Constructions of Presidential Campaigns” along with the 2016 update are available free of charge at http://projectlooksharp.org/?action=mcpc_2016

For more information, email looksharp@ithaca.edu or call 607-274-3471.

 

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

 

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

 

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Going Beyond “Just Say No” and Cybersafety

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Download as PDF

 

Going Beyond “Just Say No” and Cybersafety

Dr. Cyndy Scheibe Director of Project Look Sharp at Ithaca College

Healthy Strategies for Helping Children & Teens Use Media Wisely

• Learn fact vs. fiction in advertising & media

• Counter messages about alcohol, tobacco, and junk food.

This lively and interactive workshop addresses the challenges parents face in helping children and teens navigate the complex media-saturated world in which they live, along with practical suggestions using media literacy.  Drawing from her background in developmental psychology and more than 20 years of experience in media literacy education, Dr. Scheibe will demonstrate how media literacy approaches can be used to foster critical thinking and discussion about the media messages they encounter and to empower them with actions they can take to develop wise and healthy media habits. Topics will include: what research shows about media use by today’s children and teens; safe, healthy and effective use of the internet; telling fact from fiction in advertising and other media messages; countering media messages about alcohol, drugs, and junk food; and issues involving social media and cyberbullying.  Participants will receive handouts and learn approaches that they can use immediately with children of any age.

Free & open To everyone with special focus for middle and high school parents, caregivers, students, educators, and counselors.

Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016
5:30–7:00 p.m.
Activities Room, Ithaca High School

Door Prizes — Light Refreshments

Sponsored by the Community Coalition for Healthy Youth and the Alcohol & Drug Council of Tompkins County.

www.healthyyouth.org

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Project Look Sharp Offers Media Literacy Analysis of Presidential Campaigns to Longview

Project Look Sharp Offers Media Literacy Analysis of Presidential Campaigns to Longview

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ITHACA, NY- September 21, 2016- On Wednesday Aug. 31 executive director of Project Look Sharp and professor of psychology at Ithaca College, Cyndy Scheibe presented at Longview to discuss media literacy and the current presidential election.

Longview is a non-for-profit organization that operates as a residential living community for older adults, providing them with affordable housing and other care options. Ithaca College and Longview enjoy a unique partnership together. Just across the street from the IC campus, residents of Longview have access to educational, social, cultural and health related programs through Ithaca College’s five schools.

Dr. Scheibe provided the residents of Longview with a perspective and education on media literacy to help them better understand the context of today’s media messages, including the upcoming presidential election.

In her presentation Scheibe discussed:

-How media messages have constructed our understanding of presidential candidates and their campaigns from 1800-present.

-How media literacy can help us make sense of political news and the political messages that surround us today

The presentation also included discussions about push polls, the FUD factor, and key questions about political messages.

In the U.S. in 2014, approximately 59.4% of adults 65 years and older voted in national elections. Of that percentage, 18.7% of adults 65 years and over vote in New York State according to the United States Census Bureau.

According to the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, only 11% of media coverage focused on candidates’ policy positions, leadership abilities or personal and professional histories. A majority of coverage has focused on the premise of “he said, she said” between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, which makes it increasingly difficult to discern fact from fiction.

To help seniors discern fact from fiction throughout the media’s coverage of the upcoming presidential election, the presentation offered solutions to the media’s constant overflow of information.

 

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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