Going Beyond “Just Say No” and Cybersafety

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Going Beyond “Just Say No” and Cybersafety

Dr. Cyndy Scheibe Director of Project Look Sharp at Ithaca College

Healthy Strategies for Helping Children & Teens Use Media Wisely

• Learn fact vs. fiction in advertising & media

• Counter messages about alcohol, tobacco, and junk food.

This lively and interactive workshop addresses the challenges parents face in helping children and teens navigate the complex media-saturated world in which they live, along with practical suggestions using media literacy.  Drawing from her background in developmental psychology and more than 20 years of experience in media literacy education, Dr. Scheibe will demonstrate how media literacy approaches can be used to foster critical thinking and discussion about the media messages they encounter and to empower them with actions they can take to develop wise and healthy media habits. Topics will include: what research shows about media use by today’s children and teens; safe, healthy and effective use of the internet; telling fact from fiction in advertising and other media messages; countering media messages about alcohol, drugs, and junk food; and issues involving social media and cyberbullying.  Participants will receive handouts and learn approaches that they can use immediately with children of any age.

Free & open To everyone with special focus for middle and high school parents, caregivers, students, educators, and counselors.

Tuesday, Oct. 4, 2016
5:30–7:00 p.m.
Activities Room, Ithaca High School

Door Prizes — Light Refreshments

Sponsored by the Community Coalition for Healthy Youth and the Alcohol & Drug Council of Tompkins County.

www.healthyyouth.org

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Project Look Sharp Offers Media Literacy Analysis of Presidential Campaigns to Longview

Project Look Sharp Offers Media Literacy Analysis of Presidential Campaigns to Longview

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ITHACA, NY- September 21, 2016- On Wednesday Aug. 31 executive director of Project Look Sharp and professor of psychology at Ithaca College, Cyndy Scheibe presented at Longview to discuss media literacy and the current presidential election.

Longview is a non-for-profit organization that operates as a residential living community for older adults, providing them with affordable housing and other care options. Ithaca College and Longview enjoy a unique partnership together. Just across the street from the IC campus, residents of Longview have access to educational, social, cultural and health related programs through Ithaca College’s five schools.

Dr. Scheibe provided the residents of Longview with a perspective and education on media literacy to help them better understand the context of today’s media messages, including the upcoming presidential election.

In her presentation Scheibe discussed:

-How media messages have constructed our understanding of presidential candidates and their campaigns from 1800-present.

-How media literacy can help us make sense of political news and the political messages that surround us today

The presentation also included discussions about push polls, the FUD factor, and key questions about political messages.

In the U.S. in 2014, approximately 59.4% of adults 65 years and older voted in national elections. Of that percentage, 18.7% of adults 65 years and over vote in New York State according to the United States Census Bureau.

According to the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy, only 11% of media coverage focused on candidates’ policy positions, leadership abilities or personal and professional histories. A majority of coverage has focused on the premise of “he said, she said” between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, which makes it increasingly difficult to discern fact from fiction.

To help seniors discern fact from fiction throughout the media’s coverage of the upcoming presidential election, the presentation offered solutions to the media’s constant overflow of information.

 

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Free Learning Opportunity for Elementary Teachers: Teaching Sustainability with Media Literacy for Young Learners

Sustainability Webinar 2_1

The media literacy initiative, Project Look Sharp, is at it again. This time they are sharing their media literacy curriculum expertise through an upcoming live webinar. Aimed at elementary sustainability programs, the webinar will teach impactful and applicable pedagogies to integrate into the classroom. It’s free and going live on May 5, 2016 from 4-5PM EDT.

Sox Sperry, Project Look Sharp’s primary curriculum writer, will lead participants in an engaging exploration of elements from Project Look Sharp’s lessons related to sustainability for teachers in the elementary grades. Not only will Sperry lead participants through the program, but he will provide free materials for classroom use, available via the PLS website.

The program will offer elementary educators and teachers-in-training pedagogical techniques and curriculum materials to support a deeper understanding of how to use media documents that:
– support content teaching about water quality, climate change and hunger
– introduce media production as a way to deepen media literacy awareness
– encourage core subject integration of ELA, math, science and social studies.

Sperry will also examine media literacy goals analyzing media target audience and purpose, as well as decoding techniques. He will explore ways to use video creation & analysis along with website articles and graphs as a means to teach common core ELA and math skills, Next Generation Science disciplinary core ideas, and C3 Social Studies concepts. The skills this webinar teaches will allow teachers to stay current and focused within their own curriculum standards while integrating crucial media literacy skills into their classrooms.

For more information and to register for the webinar go to:

http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07ecijdzjaffb5c3da&llr=puivi6cab

You can email us at looksharp@ithaca.edu or contact us by phone at (607) 274-3471. This webinar will be archived on the Project Look Sharp webinar site for those who cannot participate during the live event.

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Join PLS’ next webinar, “Teaching About Climate Change Using the Tools of Media Literacy”

Join Project Look Sharp’s next webinar, “Teaching About Climate Change Using the Tools of Media Literacy.” It’s free and going live on

Tuesday March 8, 2016 from 7-8PM EDT.

Sox Sperry, Project Look Sharp’s primary curriculum writer, will lead participants on a participatory exploration of lessons covering media representations of global warming and climate change. This kit is available free and online at:
http://www.projectlooksharp.org/?action=global_warming

The webinar will offer Middle and High School educators, community educators and teachers-in-training pedagogical techniques and curriculum materials to support a deeper understanding for how to use a wide variety of media documents that:

• support content teaching about climate change
• examine media representations of global warming related to media literacy
concepts of credibility, bias and impact
• encourage strong sense critical thinking by asking questions about all
media messages, not just those with which we may disagree.

Sperry will examine media literacy goals analyzing authorship, accuracy and sourcing. He will explore ways to use different media representations of climate change as a means to teach common core ELA skills in writing to develop claims, supply evidence and analyze conclusions.

Participants will leave the interactive webinar with handouts, lessons, connections with other educators, and other tools to immediately integrate media literacy into curriculum design.

For more information and to register for the webinar go to: (http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=puivi6cab&oeidk=a07ec8romdp58a4a5da). You can email us at looksharp@ithaca.edu or contact us by phone at (607) 274-3471. This webinar will be archived on the Project Look Sharp webinar site for those who cannot participate during the live event.

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

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Successful Pilot of PLS’ Video Training to Graduate Teacher Education Course

On February 11, PLS’ Director of Curriculum and Staff Development, Mr. Chris Sperry, launched a video training titled Constructivist Media Decoding. Via the internet, he delivered the first of a two-session course that supported his goal: to integrate media literacy into teacher education classes.

At the Antioch New England Graduate School of Education in Keene, New Hampshire, Chris virtually joined the classroom via Adobe Connect. In his first session, Sperry focused on explaining the rationale and pedagogy for integrating the analysis of rich media documents into the classroom, and further explained how they tie into Common Core literacy and/or content standards. The tasks these education students of Professor Karlan’s design class for secondary environmental studies participated in include: decoding and debriefing a video of classroom practice, and utilizing two media literacy frameworks. This session ended with an assignment to (a) identify one or two media documents for analysis tied to a specific student audience and curriculum goals, and (b) develop initial questions and a plan for leading the decoding.

In the second session on March 3rd, with Chris Sperry reviewing and participating, two student volunteers will teach brief decoding activities, while the rest of the classroom role-plays students. Sperry will provide a resource guide and rubric to support the student teachers in their preparation.

This pilot program in Constructivist Media Decoding benefits the teacher education students and faculty. It provides the students with hands-on experience tied to content and standards, resources to continue this work, a pedagogy for integrating critical analysis of diverse texts, and much more. Meanwhile, the teacher education faculty witnesses and receives support for integrating media literacy into their curriculum.

After a successful first go at this program, Sperry will continue to adapt and improve the course. The goal of this video training is to further integrate media literacy analysis and critical thinking into the classroom with teacher education curriculum, and Sperry will continue to do this as he spreads the importance of media literacy worldwide.

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Sox on the Radio: PLS’ Media Literacy Materials Support the Common Core

Project Look Sharp’s very own Sox Sperry was a guest speaker on a local upstate New York radio station, WRFI. He was featured on “Teen Roots” and the Educational Forum. The enlightening talk show airs every second and fourth Wednesday of the month.

This specific talk focused around the integration of the Common Core in the current shift in educational reform, and the role media literacy can play in this shift. Sox says, that in the age of Common Core, PLS has been a supporter of this change and of using non-textbook materials. These goals contribute to the organization’s success. In turn, PLS has become a national model for media literacy.

The host related to PLS through his involvement in an event that he once participated in with his alternative high school. The exercise brought to light many body image and race preferences that society favors, shown specifically in magazine images. The exercise encouraged and facilitated the participants to uncover biases, recognize the source, and stimulate critical thinking. The skills used and fine-tuned in this exercise are a great example of what all of Project Look Sharp’s materials aim to accomplish.

Sox then ties in the host’s experience with the Common Core’s goals and how PLS can help teachers succeed in addressing the standards. The Common Core wants students to develop skills that allow them to look at evidence and recognize sources. PLS takes these skills and integrates them into print, images, music, and other various media sources. When these skills are applied to all media, students become more knowledgeable in media literacy. Sox makes sure to point out that PLS makes this easy and accessible for teachers. The PLS website gives teachers access to free media literacy kits that teach to specific common core criteria.

Sox read a statement that PLS developed to explain their role in the Common Core. It articulately and concisely explains it all: “PLS supports the common core standards in literacy as they encourage close critical reading and creating of diverse media documents, careful evaluation of sources, evidence-based analysis, and well-reasoned thinking. Like the common core, we believe that the concept of literacy must be expanded to include reading and writing using the diverse media forms of the 21st century. We believe that authentic assessments of common core standards should test the broad and deep capacity of students without undermining their abilities through a narrow view of thinking reading, writing and communicating. We believe that common core lessons cannot be scripted but must rely on the creative professional and empowered capacities of teachers to facilitate the learning process.”

The host and Sox ended their discussion with this final point: Media literacy skills equip students with the skills to look at all sides of a particular issue. It teaches students to be open-minded and look at different sources. This is a very valuable skill in the age of information overload.

Sox lastly thanked the host and WRFI for being an important player in media literacy education.

Listen to Sox Sperry on “Teen Roots” by pressing play below:

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