Free Learning Opportunity for Elementary Teachers: Teaching Sustainability with Media Literacy for Young Learners

Sustainability Webinar 2_1

The media literacy initiative, Project Look Sharp, is at it again. This time they are sharing their media literacy curriculum expertise through an upcoming live webinar. Aimed at elementary sustainability programs, the webinar will teach impactful and applicable pedagogies to integrate into the classroom. It’s free and going live on May 5, 2016 from 4-5PM EDT.

Sox Sperry, Project Look Sharp’s primary curriculum writer, will lead participants in an engaging exploration of elements from Project Look Sharp’s lessons related to sustainability for teachers in the elementary grades. Not only will Sperry lead participants through the program, but he will provide free materials for classroom use, available via the PLS website.

The program will offer elementary educators and teachers-in-training pedagogical techniques and curriculum materials to support a deeper understanding of how to use media documents that:
– support content teaching about water quality, climate change and hunger
– introduce media production as a way to deepen media literacy awareness
– encourage core subject integration of ELA, math, science and social studies.

Sperry will also examine media literacy goals analyzing media target audience and purpose, as well as decoding techniques. He will explore ways to use video creation & analysis along with website articles and graphs as a means to teach common core ELA and math skills, Next Generation Science disciplinary core ideas, and C3 Social Studies concepts. The skills this webinar teaches will allow teachers to stay current and focused within their own curriculum standards while integrating crucial media literacy skills into their classrooms.

For more information and to register for the webinar go to:

http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07ecijdzjaffb5c3da&llr=puivi6cab

You can email us at looksharp@ithaca.edu or contact us by phone at (607) 274-3471. This webinar will be archived on the Project Look Sharp webinar site for those who cannot participate during the live event.

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Join PLS’ next webinar, “Teaching About Climate Change Using the Tools of Media Literacy”

Join Project Look Sharp’s next webinar, “Teaching About Climate Change Using the Tools of Media Literacy.” It’s free and going live on

Tuesday March 8, 2016 from 7-8PM EDT.

Sox Sperry, Project Look Sharp’s primary curriculum writer, will lead participants on a participatory exploration of lessons covering media representations of global warming and climate change. This kit is available free and online at:
http://www.projectlooksharp.org/?action=global_warming

The webinar will offer Middle and High School educators, community educators and teachers-in-training pedagogical techniques and curriculum materials to support a deeper understanding for how to use a wide variety of media documents that:

• support content teaching about climate change
• examine media representations of global warming related to media literacy
concepts of credibility, bias and impact
• encourage strong sense critical thinking by asking questions about all
media messages, not just those with which we may disagree.

Sperry will examine media literacy goals analyzing authorship, accuracy and sourcing. He will explore ways to use different media representations of climate change as a means to teach common core ELA skills in writing to develop claims, supply evidence and analyze conclusions.

Participants will leave the interactive webinar with handouts, lessons, connections with other educators, and other tools to immediately integrate media literacy into curriculum design.

For more information and to register for the webinar go to: (http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=puivi6cab&oeidk=a07ec8romdp58a4a5da). You can email us at looksharp@ithaca.edu or contact us by phone at (607) 274-3471. This webinar will be archived on the Project Look Sharp webinar site for those who cannot participate during the live event.

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

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Successful Pilot of PLS’ Video Training to Graduate Teacher Education Course

On February 11, PLS’ Director of Curriculum and Staff Development, Mr. Chris Sperry, launched a video training titled Constructivist Media Decoding. Via the internet, he delivered the first of a two-session course that supported his goal: to integrate media literacy into teacher education classes.

At the Antioch New England Graduate School of Education in Keene, New Hampshire, Chris virtually joined the classroom via Adobe Connect. In his first session, Sperry focused on explaining the rationale and pedagogy for integrating the analysis of rich media documents into the classroom, and further explained how they tie into Common Core literacy and/or content standards. The tasks these education students of Professor Karlan’s design class for secondary environmental studies participated in include: decoding and debriefing a video of classroom practice, and utilizing two media literacy frameworks. This session ended with an assignment to (a) identify one or two media documents for analysis tied to a specific student audience and curriculum goals, and (b) develop initial questions and a plan for leading the decoding.

In the second session on March 3rd, with Chris Sperry reviewing and participating, two student volunteers will teach brief decoding activities, while the rest of the classroom role-plays students. Sperry will provide a resource guide and rubric to support the student teachers in their preparation.

This pilot program in Constructivist Media Decoding benefits the teacher education students and faculty. It provides the students with hands-on experience tied to content and standards, resources to continue this work, a pedagogy for integrating critical analysis of diverse texts, and much more. Meanwhile, the teacher education faculty witnesses and receives support for integrating media literacy into their curriculum.

After a successful first go at this program, Sperry will continue to adapt and improve the course. The goal of this video training is to further integrate media literacy analysis and critical thinking into the classroom with teacher education curriculum, and Sperry will continue to do this as he spreads the importance of media literacy worldwide.

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Sox on the Radio: PLS’ Media Literacy Materials Support the Common Core

Project Look Sharp’s very own Sox Sperry was a guest speaker on a local upstate New York radio station, WRFI. He was featured on “Teen Roots” and the Educational Forum. The enlightening talk show airs every second and fourth Wednesday of the month.

This specific talk focused around the integration of the Common Core in the current shift in educational reform, and the role media literacy can play in this shift. Sox says, that in the age of Common Core, PLS has been a supporter of this change and of using non-textbook materials. These goals contribute to the organization’s success. In turn, PLS has become a national model for media literacy.

The host related to PLS through his involvement in an event that he once participated in with his alternative high school. The exercise brought to light many body image and race preferences that society favors, shown specifically in magazine images. The exercise encouraged and facilitated the participants to uncover biases, recognize the source, and stimulate critical thinking. The skills used and fine-tuned in this exercise are a great example of what all of Project Look Sharp’s materials aim to accomplish.

Sox then ties in the host’s experience with the Common Core’s goals and how PLS can help teachers succeed in addressing the standards. The Common Core wants students to develop skills that allow them to look at evidence and recognize sources. PLS takes these skills and integrates them into print, images, music, and other various media sources. When these skills are applied to all media, students become more knowledgeable in media literacy. Sox makes sure to point out that PLS makes this easy and accessible for teachers. The PLS website gives teachers access to free media literacy kits that teach to specific common core criteria.

Sox read a statement that PLS developed to explain their role in the Common Core. It articulately and concisely explains it all: “PLS supports the common core standards in literacy as they encourage close critical reading and creating of diverse media documents, careful evaluation of sources, evidence-based analysis, and well-reasoned thinking. Like the common core, we believe that the concept of literacy must be expanded to include reading and writing using the diverse media forms of the 21st century. We believe that authentic assessments of common core standards should test the broad and deep capacity of students without undermining their abilities through a narrow view of thinking reading, writing and communicating. We believe that common core lessons cannot be scripted but must rely on the creative professional and empowered capacities of teachers to facilitate the learning process.”

The host and Sox ended their discussion with this final point: Media literacy skills equip students with the skills to look at all sides of a particular issue. It teaches students to be open-minded and look at different sources. This is a very valuable skill in the age of information overload.

Sox lastly thanked the host and WRFI for being an important player in media literacy education.

Listen to Sox Sperry on “Teen Roots” by pressing play below:

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CHRIS SPERRY OF MEDIA LITERACY ORGANIZATION PROJECT LOOK SHARP PUBLISHES ARTICLE IN THE JOURNAL OF MEDIA LITERACY

ITHACA, New York – February 9, 2016 – Chris Sperry of Ithaca College’s media literacy organization, Project Look Sharp, recently authored an article titled “Constructivist Media Decoding in the Social Studies: Leveraging the New Standards for Educational Change”.

The article was published in the Journal of Media Literacy, Vol. 62, and focuses on how to incorporate media literacy skills and analytical thinking into social studies lessons. Additionally, Sperry writes about the integration of media literacy with C3 and the Common Core requirements that are now developing.

The research addresses the need of media literacy lessons in social studies educational curriculums. With more information mediums (such as videos, photos, and graphics) present and interacting with society, curriculums need to be modernized to include analytical thinking – not purely a traditional fact-based approach. The article explains how teachers can facilitate students to build these skills through referencing lessons that are free to access via Project Look Sharp’s website at: http://www.projectlooksharp.org/. Chris Sperry encourages the Common Core and C3 standards to include requirements to teach media literacy skills that are crucial in delivering a well-rounded education.

“Constructivist Media Decoding in the Social Studies: Leveraging the New Standards for Educational Change” by Chris Sperry of Project Look Sharp can be accessed for free online at:

http://www.frankwbaker.com/mlc/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/jml-ccs.pdf

 

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

 

chris article

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Project Look Sharp to Host ‘Media Constructions of Martin Luther King, Jr.’ Webinar

Project Look Sharp to host ‘Media Constructions of Martin Luther King, Jr.’ webinar

Sox Sperry, Project Look Sharp’s primary curriculum writer, will lead participants on an exploration of lessons covering media representations of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in a free hourlong webinar at 4 p.m. EDT on Jan. 7, 2016.

The webinar — which will feature the “Media Constructions of Martin Luther King, Jr.” kit that is available for free on the Project Look Sharp website — will offer middle and high school educators, community educators and teachers-in-training pedagogical techniques and curriculum materials to support a deeper understanding for how to use a wide variety of media documents that support content teaching about social justice movements; examine media representations of ongoing struggles against racism and the practice of nonviolence; and encourage the analysis of meanings and messages constructed about King’s life.

The webinar will also explore media literacy goals analyzing historical context, purpose and credibility of media constructions using different media forms of King’s speeches as a means to teach common core English language arts skills in speaking, listening and reading for information. Participants will leave with handouts, lessons and other tools to immediately integrate media literacy into their curriculum design.

“Most of us only know Dr. King through media references since fewer and fewer of us have had the opportunity to hear him or to know him in person. These media constructions of Dr. King are made for particular purposes and are interpreted in different ways by media consumers,” Sperry said. “In order to understand the many meanings of Dr. King’s rich and complex life, we need to be able to ask key questions about the media constructions through which we have come to know him. Only if we learn to ask the next, deeper question can we possibly hope to come to know the real, deeper person who was Martin Luther King, Jr.”
For more information and to register for the webinar go to the registration link,

http://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?oeidk=a07ebxaxf3647dee1dd&llr=puivi6cab

You can email us at looksharp@ithaca.edu or contact us by phone at (607) 274-3471. This webinar will be archived on the Project Look Sharp website for those who cannot participate this time around.

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

Sox Sperry

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