Project Look Sharp Webinar: Teaching about the Middle East through Media Literacy

On Thursday November 6th from 7:00 PM to 8:00 PM EST, Chris Sperry, Project Look Sharp’s Director of Curriculum and Staff Development will be conducting a free webinar event about the Middle East through Media Literacy. Chris Sperry has had many years of experience with teaching high school students about the Middle East.

During this webinar, Chris will explore the role that Media Literacy, Project-Based Learning and lesson design can play in motivating and engaging all students in deep scholarship, critical thinking and personal growth. Viewers will be introduced to lesson models from the Project Look Sharp curriculum kit, Media Construction of the Middle East, a video demonstration of the classroom media decoding process, a sample of a student simulated Middle East peace conference, and how teachers can teach key content while addressing common core standards in social studies and speaking and listening. This webinar will be interactive with live chat, video demonstrations, polls, and a Q&A at the end!

Register now at http://tinyurl.com/MiddleEastCurriculum

 

Project look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

 

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

 

 

 

 

 

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Cyndy Scheibe of Project Look Sharp Presents – Reading the World: Constructivist Media Decoding and Citizenship

Cyndy Scheibe of Project Look Sharp Presents – Reading the World: Constructivist Media Decoding and Citizenship

On Friday October 10th, Cyndy Scheibe presented on behalf of Project Look Sharp, in the Wang Conference Center at Stony Brook University. Cyndy presented a topic called, Reading the World: Constructivist Media Decoding and Citizenship. This fast-paced interactive workshop used models for integrating media analysis across the curriculum from kindergarten through college. Inquiry-based media decoding has the potential to engage all students in the process of learning Common Core literacy skills, exploring controversial issues from multiple perspectives, and developing life-long habits of inquiry about credibility, sourcing, bias, and other key citizenship skills. The activities demonstrated how educators can use engaging media documents, coupled with key questions and targeted probing,and taught both core content and critical thinking skills, using examples from health, science, social studies and ELA.

Cyndy Scheibe is the Executive Director and Founder of Project Look Sharp and co-author of the book The Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy: Critical Thinking in a Multimedia World (2012, Sage/Corwin). She is also Professor of Psychology at Ithaca College where she has taught courses in developmental psychology, media research, and media literacy for more than 25 years. She was a founding board member of the National Association for Media  literacy Education, and is author of several articles on media literacy education and practice. She is a contributing editor to many of the media literacy curriculum kits developed by Project Look Sharp, and co-author of the Critical Thinking and Health kit series based on media literacy for elementary grades. She received her doctorate in Human Development (1987) from Cornell University

 

Project look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

 

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Using Media Decoding and Production to Invest Learners in Sustainability

Ithaca College Alumni, Kelsey Greene (’12), presented on behalf of Project Look Sharp at the NAAEE conference in Ottawa, Ontario, on Thursday, October 9 from 2:15pm to 3:45 in the Ottawa Convention Centre. In her interactive workshop she used Project Look Sharp’s sustainability curriculum kits to model how educators in formal and informal learning sectors can teach about relevant sustainability issues through deconstruction and production of diverse media texts. Project Look Sharp offers two kits on sustainability. They included: Media Constructions of Sustainability and Media Constructions of Sustainability: Fingerlakes. Each kit provides multiple lesson plans that explore how sustainability has been presented in the media. Each kit created by Project Look Sharp incorporates media literacy and critical thinking. This session encouraged learners to become active agents of change in their community through media production.

Kelsey Greene interned with Project Look Sharp for two semesters while attending Ithaca College. One of her larger tasks as an intern was working on the Finger Lakes sustainability kit. Kelsey went to the 2011 NAAEE conference in Raleigh with Chris and Sox Sperr; two staff members of Project Look Sharp. Kelsey has continued to work in the media literacy field since graduating from Ithaca College in 2012 and is currently attending the University at Buffalo for my M.Ed in Education.

Project look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Cyndy Scheibe Takes Part in School Newspaper Training

On September 2, Cyndy Scheibe gave a presentation to the staff and editors of The Ithacan. She presented on Media Literacy with an emphasis on equality in the newsroom. Scheibe has worked closely with The Ithacan for year’s because she is on the Advisory Board for Ithaca College Publications.

The presentation placed an emphasis on media production and benign racism. In regards to media production, Scheibe had members of the staff brainstorm ideas on how to incorporate more diversity into stories and how to recruit a diversity of students interested in joining the publication. She also covered, benign racisms and whose stories get covered and whose don’t.

Student’s walked away with a comprehensive understanding of unbiased reporting as well as a new set of skills on media production. Scheibe hopes that the students will take these lessons on media literacy throughout their careers as journalists and to spread their knowledge of media literacy to others.

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Project Look Sharp’s Sox Sperry Presented At Food, Farm and Sustainability Institute

Ithaca, N.Y- Sox Sperry returned to his alma mater this past June to present as part of Hampshire College’s Food, Farm, and Sustainability Institute. Sperry’s presentation was part of a six-week session, which led students, faculty, staff and alumni through the hands on experience of food production and sustainable agriculture.

Sperry presented to a small group of eight students and introduced the concept of constructivist media decoding. He also led them through an analyses of farming related documents from the Project Look Sharp’s Media Construction of Sustainability Food, Water, and Agriculture and Media Constructions of Sustainability: Finger Lakes. Sperry concluded his presentation by suggesting a number of outlets where media literacy can be a tool for community education on issues related to food, farming and sustainability.

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Project Look Sharp’s Media Literacy Summer Institute Attracts a Diverse Set of Educators

Ithaca, NY- Project Look Sharp hosted it’s annual Media Literacy Summer Institute this past July which attracted 18 educators from a variety of institutions. Participants visited from across the U.S., and one attendee came from as far as India. This five-day course immersed educators from all levels in the practice of critical thinking, media analysis and media production.

Cyndy Scheibe, Chris Sperry, Roger Seville and Armin Heurich led participants through an extensive examination of media literacy. Afternoon sessions provided the attendees with the opportunity to get hands on training with media productions, as well as individualized sessions to deepen their knowledge of digital production tools. Morning and afternoon sessions were connected through discussion and exploration of the web. Activities included learning about blogs, wikis, presentation software and Google drive. The goal of the series was to have participants use their critical thinking to evaluate media sources, recognize sources of bias, and effectively decode media messages.

In regards to the training, one participant observed, “These are certainly concepts that I can take into my classroom and build into our new curriculum. I acquired a lot of new language with which to discuss media.”

Tools that were taught are vital to understanding media literacy. The hope among the presenters was that the attendees would be able to incorporate the lessons into their classrooms and spread the knowledge to their students. The series also offered attendees the chance to work individually with the facilitators to create a customized media literacy implementation plan for their classroom. They then presented their plans to the group at the end of the session, which allowed for feedback as well as comments from their peers.

When informational sessions were not taking place, participants had the opportunity to explore the beauty of Ithaca, NY. With the multiple array of options to choose from, participants were always busy. Whether it was exploring the gorges, the commons, or dining at one of the many restaurants that Ithaca has to offer –  there was certainty something for everyone! At the end of the workshop, participants also received a copy of “Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy”, co-written by Project Look Sharp Director Cyndy Scheibe.

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