Project Look Sharp Leads Training Session for Local Librarians

Project Look Sharp leads training session for local librarians

Project Look Sharp’s Cyndy Scheibe led a training session for about 40 librarians in conjunction with the Board of Cooperative Educational Services on Sept. 22 in Fulton, New York. The session began with conversations about the roles librarians play with teachers and the role of technology in children’s lives in their education. In the afternoon, Scheibe led a discussion about media literacy, copyright issues and fair use.

Scheibe said for many teachers and librarians, teaching media literacy is an issue of time, especially with common core standards and state modules. This training session was meant to discuss media literacy and find ways to integrate it into what students are already learning.

“Librarians have always been the gatekeepers to media for children in schools. And part of their job is learning new technology and supporting the work of teachers and students when they’re exploring new topics,” Scheibe said.

Scheibe showed examples from Project Look Sharp’s lessons, such as the third grade Africa curriculum. She also showed a video of Chris Sperry, another member of the Project Look Sharp team, leading a constructivist media decoding session. Toward the end of the day, one of the librarians volunteered to lead a decoding herself of one of the commercial lessons from Project Look Sharp’s website, “Real Bugs.” After she was done, Scheibe and the audience gave feedback.

For more information, you can email us at looksharp@ithaca.edu or contact us by phone at 607-274-3471. You can also reach Cyndy Scheibe at scheibe@ithaca.edu.

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Project Look Sharp Hosts Campus Event for Educators

Project Look Sharp hosts campus event for educators

On Aug. 24, Chris Sperry and Cyndy Scheibe hosted a campus event for a small group of educators from upstate New York who had already completed the Project Look Sharp Summer Institute or the Facing History course to deepen their classroom application.

In the morning, Scheibe worked with teachers discussing the process of media literacy and its impact on classroom learning. Sperry worked with teachers to deepen their work with the Facing History curriculum using Critical Friends Protocals for peer coaching. In the afternoon three of the participants practiced leading media decoding exercise while the rest of the group role-played students in the classroom. The group evaluated each session and synthesized best practices for leading a constructivist media analysis session.

Facing History and Ourselves, an organization that works to instill intellectual vigor and curiosity in the world’s secondary school students by providing ideas and tools that support the needs of teachers, has partnered with Project Look Sharp in the past. Sperry previously worked with a Facing History leadership team on integrating media literacy into the Facing History curriculum and methodology, and he has been using the Facing History curriculum in his high school humanities classes for thirty years.

Project Look Sharp’s Summer Institute was an intensive, weeklong media literacy course for educators. Participants would receive training in the theory and practice of media literacy, learn applications for digital technology and work individually with a Project Look Sharp “coach” to develop and implement a media literacy integration project.

“There has not been another workshop in my 30 years of teaching that has influenced me as much as the summer week I spent at Look Sharp,” wrote Mary Moyer, an elementary librarian.

In order to accommodate busy schedules in a digital world, Project Look Sharp is planning a hybrid version of this workshop for the future.

For more information, you can email us at looksharp@ithaca.edu or call 607-274-3471. You can also reach Chris Sperry at csperry@ithaca.edu and Cyndy Scheibe at scheibe@ithaca.edu.

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Project Look Sharp Presents at Digital Literacy Conference

Project Look Sharp presents at digital literacy conference

Cyndy Scheibe presented “Digital Literacy with Project Look Sharp” on May 14 at Genesee Community College in Batavia, New York, to an audience of approximately 45 teachers for Digital Media in the Classroom Conference Day. The conference also included a keynote by ImagineYOU@TeenCentral, a youth leader driven initiative based in Rochester, New York, and breakout sessions about digital audio, graphic tablets and stop motion video.

Scheibe’s two-hour talk focused on some topics from her book “The Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy” — such as the basic overview of the process of media literacy and constructivist media coding — as well as linking media literacy to the common core standards and how teachers can use new technologies in the classroom.

Scheibe engaged the audience by supporting her points with multiple examples. She led a constructivist media decoding of two historical paintings, highlighting the effectiveness of media literacy pedagogies to address the teacher’s goals — including introducing or reinforcing core content, discussing sensitive issues and encouraging involvement by all students in the class. She also discussed ways teachers could use Twitter in both lower and upper elementary classes, and she showed examples of student-produced PSAs and counter-advertisements, which are used to speak out about advertising messages.

“Media literacy is — first and foremost — literacy. That means both ‘reading’ messages in a wide range of media formats and ‘writing’ or creating your own messages using a wide range of media formats. Students learn an enormous amount by creating their own media content,” Scheibe said.

The presentation was met with a high level of involvement and positive feedback.

One participant commented, “Her strategies could be implemented in the classroom immediately. She instructs to instill an intrinsic sense of learning in her audience and does it quite successfully.”

For more information, you can email us at looksharp@ithaca.edu or contact us by phone at 607-274-3471. You can also reach Cyndy Scheibe at scheibe@ithaca.edu.

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Online Resources for ‘Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy’ Updated

Online resources for ‘Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy’ updated

“The Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy: Critical Thinking in a Multimedia World” by Cyndy Scheibe and Faith Rogow includes 139 lesson ideas using media literacy. The companion website has been updated to include digital resources and complete support documents such as student worksheets, relevant video clips, example PowerPoint slides and key questions for the analysis of media messages for the seven complete lesson plans.

The book poses the question: “What does it mean to be literate in today’s world, and how can those literacy skills be developed?” To answer, it provides practical tools that integrate media literacy into the K-12 curriculum and beyond. Suggested activities and teaching strategies are included to assist educators in focusing on the skills students need to thrive in a digital age.

“Scheibe and Rogow have developed an innovative approach to help teachers master the secrets of inquiry learning for media literacy education,” wrote Renee Hobbs, founding director of the Harrington School of Communication and Media, in a review. “They demonstrate how to support students’ deep reading with a variety of print and non-print texts. Educators using these techniques will see dramatic improvements in the quality of student critical thinking skills.”

Scheibe and Rogow have previously worked together with Project Look Sharp and the National Association of Media Literacy Education. They brought their past experiences of teaching in the classroom and developing media literacy curricula to provide teachers with the tools necessary to overcome the challenges facing media literacy today.

Scheibe said she and Rogow wrote the book to capture the key concepts, stories and pedagogies to pass along to educators in a resource they could refer to over time. While many academic books and workbooks on media literacy exist, Scheibe and Rogow felt none accomplished both in the same book. Their hope is for the book to be used extensively in teacher education classes as a model for how any teacher could incorporate media literacy in their lessons.

“Media literacy is — first and foremost — literacy, so we need to teach it the same way we teach reading and writing: using a developmental approach, weaving it into all curriculum areas where it makes sense,” Scheibe said. “It’s not a new content area that you have to add on to the others, but a pedagogy that teachers can dovetail with what they are already teaching.”

“The Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy” is published by Corwin (http://www.corwin.com/books/Book236061/reviews) , and also available from Amazon.com (http://amzn.com/1412997585)

For more information, you can email us at looksharp@ithaca.edu or contact us by phone at 607-274-3471. To contact the authors, email Cyndy Scheibe at scheibe@ithaca.edu or Faith Rogow at medialited@earthlink.net.

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Project Look Sharp to Host Webinar About Presidential Campaigns

Project Look Sharp will host a free webinar, “Media Construction of Presidential Campaigns,” from 7–8 p.m. EST Nov. 3.

Sox Sperry, Project Look Sharp’s primary curriculum writer, will lead participants on a participatory exploration of high school lessons covering media representations of U.S. presidential elections from 1800–2008.  The media and lessons will be drawn from the popular Presidential Campaigns curriculum kit, which is available free online at projectlooksharp.org.

The webinar will offer high school educators and teachers-in-training pedagogical techniques and free curriculum materials to support a deeper understanding of how to use a wide variety of media forms across the historical spectrum — media from 19th century portraits, songs and handbills, to 21st century websites, Twitter and email — to study historical context and to question their credibility. The presenter will also focus on the Key Concepts for Media Analysis. Participants will leave with handouts and other tools to integrate media literacy into their curriculum design.

For more information and to register for the webinar go to:

 http://ithaca.adobeconnect.com/campaignswebinar/

You can email us at looksharp@ithaca.edu or contact us by phone at 607-274-3471. This webinar will be archived on the Project Look Sharp webinar site for those who cannot participate during the live event.

Project Look Sharp is Ithaca College’s Media Literacy Initiative. Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking through media literacy in school curriculum and teaching. They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.

From day one, Ithaca College prepares students for personal and professional success through hands-on experience with internships, research and study abroad. Its integrative curriculum builds bridges across disciplines and uniquely blends liberal arts and professional study. Located in New York’s Finger Lakes region, the College is home to 6,100 undergraduate and 400 graduate students and offers over 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Science and Human Performance, and Music.

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Project Look Sharp to Host Summer Institute for Media Literacy

Ithaca, NY- Project Look Sharp is excited to be hosting another summer media literacy institute on the Ithaca College campus. This five-day course will immerse educators from all levels in the practice of critical thinking, media analysis and media production. Through morning classes, production training and individual coaching sessions, Project Look Sharp will help teachers, librarians or simply those interested in the media, build a valuable tool kit to better understand media and be shared in the classroom setting.
Nationally acclaimed educators and staff trainers Cyndy Scheibe, Chris Sperry, Roger Sevilla and Armin Heurich will lead participants through scheduled days which also leave room for exploration of the Ithaca area after the scheduled events. The morning session of each day will focus on the theory and practice of media literacy.  Participants will use their critical thinking skills to evaluate media sources, recognize bias in visual representations, decode media messages, and effectively use instructional media to be incorporated into each individualized curricula. Afternoon sessions will focus on a hands-on approach, where educators will learn how to use the digital tools that connect media production and media literacy. Information from the morning session will be tied into this interactive session, especially through exploration of web 2.0 outlets such as wikis, blogs, presentation software and google drive. These 21st century educational tools help educators understand media literacy, and how it can be incorporated in the classroom setting for both presentation purposes and student production opportunities.
In addition to these sessions, participants will be matched up with one of the award-winning educators to develop a customized media literacy implementation plan for their classroom or educational endeavors. As a wrap up for the institute, educators will present these plans on the final day to the other participants.
This Media Literacy Summer Institute will be held on the Ithaca College campus in Ithaca, New York from July 20th to July 24th 2015, with the days running from 8:30 am to 3:00 pm, and additional lab hours available on Wednesday and Thursday from 4:00 pm- 6:00 pm. Housing will be provided for the participants either through hotel accommodations or campus housing, and amenities will include access to the fitness center, outdoor pool and library. Each morning, a light breakfast will be provided, and a full lunch will be served on the last day of the institute. As an additional incentive, a copy of the newly released “Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy” will be included.
When not attending informational sessions, participants will have the opportunity to explore the array of activities Ithaca has to offer.  The gorges offer a beautiful setting to hike, and Cayuga Lake tours offer participants a look at some Ithaca scenery. The commons downtown presents a multitude of shopping options, while cultural prospects can be found at the Johnson Cornell Museum of Art and with the local theater productions. Finally, with more restaurants per capita than New York City, participants will have a variety of tastes to choose from when they optionally dine with each other and the Project Look Sharp Faculty.
Registration for this event will cost $815, and is New York state-aidable through CoSer 516 or cross contact with TST BOCES.  Those that are interested are encouraged to visit www.projectlooksharp.org/?action=summerinstitute for additional information.
Project Look Sharp supports the integration of critical thinking and media literacy into the teaching of core content in multiple subject areas.  They do this through developing and providing lesson plans, media materials, training, and support for educators at all education levels. The purpose of media literacy education is to help individuals of all ages develop the habits of inquiry and skills of expression they need to be critical thinkers, effective communicators, and active citizens in today’s world.
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For more information, please contact Sherrie Szeto, Program Manager at looksharp@ithaca.edu.

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